Habits

Changing a personal habit is probably the most difficult task for any of us. Unfortunately, some of our most difficult habits to break, including smoking, overeating, and poor food choices, relate directly to our health. There are also habits which form our responses to situations and events that impact our ability to live, work and interact with society, colleagues, friends and partners. Habits enable us to get to work on time and "do the right thing" when required. Some habits are considered bad and others good. We relish habits and even take comfort in the fact that "somethings never change."

Habits give us comfort. They are known quantities, our friends. They allow us to act and respond without thinking. Early in life, most of us learn what is right and wrong; from those lessons, we develop good living habits. Habits can also give us excuses for our actions. We can say, "I'm sorry, it was just one of those old habits." Habits can lead us to both success and failure.

However, when it is perfectly clear that a habit is bad and changing it can only be an improvement, why are some of us unwilling or unable to change? Is it fear? Lack of self-respect? Has the habit become an addiction?

Fortunately, change is possible. We are able to adapt and learn new habits. However, this takes a lot of work and effort. This is where most people fail, because they are unwilling to do what is necessary to change or improve habits. Ironically, some people are even unwilling to change habits detrimental to their health and life.

Habits are internal and independent of the thoughts and actions of others. They require a personal decision to change. A personal decision by you. For example, an old friend and life-long smoker who loved to smoke, decided that he would quit smoking as soon as one of the athletes he was coaching won a World Cup Ski Race. All of us who worked with this man constantly pushed him to stop smoking. We were just as repeatedly frustrated in our efforts. Then one day in the early 90's, one of his downhill racers won a World Cup event in France. On that day, he kept his promise and smoked his last cigarette.

Those of us willing to change or reshape our bad habits will move forward in all aspects of life - personally, professionally and athletically. We are the ones who learn from our mistakes, a key element to success. With a little luck and hard work thrown into the mix, we can then reach our personal goals, achieve greatness and perhaps even a level of distinction in our lives.

Written by : Super User

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The Champion's Way

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